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CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO

Who should avoid THC products?

Published Jun 16, 2022 09:00 a.m. ET
iStock / Aleksandr_Kravtsov

THC is a cannabinoid that’s utilized for both medicinal and recreational purposes, and for most of us, it’s a perfectly safe solution. However, not everyone is so fortunate. Some people should avoid THC for a wide variety of reasons. With that in mind, we’re going to talk about the five most important scenarios where THC could potentially cause harm.

1. Patients on prescription medications

Not all prescription medications react poorly to the introduction of THC, but some of the most powerful life-saving treatments can be negatively impacted. This cannabinoid may render certain medications entirely useless while enhancing others to a point where the effects could be unexpected or even dangerous, and for that reason, it’s always recommended to work closely with a medical professional before using THC in combination with prescription drugs.

2. Anyone diagnosed with CHS

CHS is a highly under-discussed illness that typically affects those that have consumed cannabis products long term, and to date, there is no proven treatment method to stop the adverse symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, lethargy, or dizziness. If you have ever felt any of the aforementioned issues on a recurring basis or been diagnosed with CHS, it may never be safe to try THC products again. Though some have luck by introducing microdoses and slowly increasing intake over time, it’s best not to make this attempt without help and advice from a medical professional.

3. Those who are hypersensitive to the effects of THC

Does THC make you feel awful? Those who are hypersensitive to the effects of this cannabinoid may feel panic, dread, uneasiness, dizziness, nauseous, or painful headaches. If that describes your general past experiences with cannabis or THC products, then it might not be safe for you to continue using them. In some cases, experimentation with dosage and combining other cannabinoids may help to alleviate the symptoms, but if it doesn’t, then it’s best to avoid THC completely.

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CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO

4. Persons with a family history of bipolar, schizophrenia, or psychosis

It might sound counterintuitive, especially when so many seem to have luck treating mental health conditions with the powerful effect of THC, but those with a family history of psychosis, bipolar, or schizophrenia are typically recommended to steer clear of this cannabinoid, as it might further exacerbate pre-existing symptoms. If you do have one of the conditions mentioned, please seek the advice and recommendation of a medical professional or family doctor before proceeding.

5. Those who are subject to drug tests

Though THC is now legal in many countries for both medicine and recreation, some companies still require drug tests for employees. Of course, this seems unjust, especially when it’s a perfectly safe and reasonable alternative to alcohol and many pharmaceuticals, but unfortunately, some states and professions still allow the practice in the name of safety. Sadly, even one time or occasional use might show up on a drug test, as there is no way to completely clear the system of acids left behind (the thing that drug tests look for to determine use), so if you’re subject to either regular or surprise drug testing, then THC is likely not a reasonable option for you.

Who would prefer irradiated cannabis
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CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO
CANNABIS WIKI CONFERENCE & EXPO

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